‘State of the Nation’ – book review

State of the nation

For a layman to understand, to a reasonable extent, the structure of the Indian constitution and its nuances, the ‘real’ meanings of many of the terms that we have come to take for granted and the way the Indian republic has progressed since 1947 and the changes that have gone into the constitution since then, is a humungous task.

And the fact that I, as a layman, was able to reasonably understand all of the above is a grand testimony not to my intellectual ability but to the lucid presentation of the material by its eminent author, Fali.S.Nariman.

A renowned lawyer and constitutional expert that he is, Nariman has opened my eyes to see the extremely tricky aspects of the longest written constitution in the world – the Indian constitution.

How the makers of the constitution intended some aspects of the document to be, how the subsequent governments got the original intent watered down, how in spite of wholeheartedly ill-intentioned governments trying to water down the pillars of the constitution some well intentioned the judges have ensured that the spirit of the founding fathers has been maintained intact more or less – all these are elucidated in great detail in this treatise, ‘State of the Nation’.

Nariman also presents, with relevant examples, the different instances wherein the President, the Parliament, the executive and the judiciary had tried to exert their independence ( or superiority, should I say ?). And that part reads like a thriller.

We also get to know some snippets from history that we might not have been privy to, like :

  • The first President Rajendra Prasad’s tussle with Pandit Nehru and his wish to assert his Presidency
  • How Raj Narain won the court battle against Indira Gandhi and challenged her election and what Indira Gandhi did, in haste, to amend the constitution just before declaring emergency
  • How even the fundamental rights were denied by Indira Gandhi citing a constitutional amendment and how the subsequent Janata government amended that saying ‘even in case of an emergency’ the fundamental rights cannot be denied to citizens
  • The working styles of the different presidents V.V.Giri, Sharma, Narayan, Venkatraman, Zail Singh and Kalam
  • How Kalam indirectly asserted his Presidency by not following the prepared text and resorting to a Tamil poem that he himself had written exhorting the parliamentarians to do their jobs and not stage walk-outs for the flimsiest of reasons
  • How Pandit Nehru didn’t have money for his tea in 1935 after an electon campaign and how he and Lal Bahadur Sastri had to count the different coins that they had to pay for their cups of tea at a railway canteen
  • How Pandit Nehru had asked the Allahabad administration to raise, by five times, the annual property tax that was levied on his ancestral home

Fali S. Nariman has had the ring side view of things and he explains his thought process with ample references to various judgments of the US Supreme Court, leading British jurists and even the then Chief Justice of Pakistan.

A great read for anyone who is interested in the working of the Indian constitution.

'State of the Nation' – book review

State of the nation

For a layman to understand, to a reasonable extent, the structure of the Indian constitution and its nuances, the ‘real’ meanings of many of the terms that we have come to take for granted and the way the Indian republic has progressed since 1947 and the changes that have gone into the constitution since then, is a humungous task.

And the fact that I, as a layman, was able to reasonably understand all of the above is a grand testimony not to my intellectual ability but to the lucid presentation of the material by its eminent author, Fali.S.Nariman.

A renowned lawyer and constitutional expert that he is, Nariman has opened my eyes to see the extremely tricky aspects of the longest written constitution in the world – the Indian constitution.

How the makers of the constitution intended some aspects of the document to be, how the subsequent governments got the original intent watered down, how in spite of wholeheartedly ill-intentioned governments trying to water down the pillars of the constitution some well intentioned the judges have ensured that the spirit of the founding fathers has been maintained intact more or less – all these are elucidated in great detail in this treatise, ‘State of the Nation’.

Nariman also presents, with relevant examples, the different instances wherein the President, the Parliament, the executive and the judiciary had tried to exert their independence ( or superiority, should I say ?). And that part reads like a thriller.

We also get to know some snippets from history that we might not have been privy to, like :

  • The first President Rajendra Prasad’s tussle with Pandit Nehru and his wish to assert his Presidency
  • How Raj Narain won the court battle against Indira Gandhi and challenged her election and what Indira Gandhi did, in haste, to amend the constitution just before declaring emergency
  • How even the fundamental rights were denied by Indira Gandhi citing a constitutional amendment and how the subsequent Janata government amended that saying ‘even in case of an emergency’ the fundamental rights cannot be denied to citizens
  • The working styles of the different presidents V.V.Giri, Sharma, Narayan, Venkatraman, Zail Singh and Kalam
  • How Kalam indirectly asserted his Presidency by not following the prepared text and resorting to a Tamil poem that he himself had written exhorting the parliamentarians to do their jobs and not stage walk-outs for the flimsiest of reasons
  • How Pandit Nehru didn’t have money for his tea in 1935 after an electon campaign and how he and Lal Bahadur Sastri had to count the different coins that they had to pay for their cups of tea at a railway canteen
  • How Pandit Nehru had asked the Allahabad administration to raise, by five times, the annual property tax that was levied on his ancestral home

Fali S. Nariman has had the ring side view of things and he explains his thought process with ample references to various judgments of the US Supreme Court, leading British jurists and even the then Chief Justice of Pakistan.

A great read for anyone who is interested in the working of the Indian constitution.

BSNL and a bottle of cyanide

‘Is this BSNL, the Indian telephone company?’

“Yes indeed, what else would this be?”

‘Ok okay, I have a problem in the land line and so..’

“Then how come you are able to talk to me on the land line?’

“See actually you are right, I meant to say that the land line is okay but the broadband..”

“Say clearly, what is your problem?”

‘Oh yes, the land line is not the problem but what happens is..”

‘Mister, can you tell me what your problem is? I have other works to attend to’.

“Oh yes, sorry, you have many things to do. I agree, so please let me complete..”

‘See Mister, you are wasting time. What is your problem?”

“My problem is that the land line that I am speaking to you in has a problem …”

“What ? You said there was no problem with the land line? C’mon, don’t’ waste my time..”

‘Sorry Sir, I don’t know where to begin, well, actually the problem is that the land line connection is pretty good and while connecting to the internet..”

“Hello, when the land line connection is good, then why are you calling us for?”

‘Well, the land line is good but the broadband internet has a problem and that is why I ..”

“Come to the point, your broadband internet has a problem, right?”

‘Absolutely correct Sir, how did you find that out?”

‘Well, Mister, we have been in this line for the last many years and we know. Ok what is the issue?’

“That is what I thought I told you Sir, the broadband connection doesn’t work”

“Okay, the broadband is the problem. Fine. Did you check the modem?’

“Well I saw all the lights go on and off from time to time yet nothing works”.

“Wait, don’t be in a hurry. You are mixing things. Check your modem first. Do all the lights glow?”

“Yes, but that is when the computer is shut off. Until then the modem lights don’t glow in unision”.

‘So your problem is that the lights in the modem don’t glow together. Does the modem work?”

‘Well, as I said, the lights glow at random when the computer is on and I wait for over 30 minutes. And by the time I lose patience and switch-off the computer, the lights in the modem begin to glow together’.

“Now I get it, Your problem is not the line, nor the modem but your computer. So when you switch-off the computer , the lights of the modem glow in unison and express solidarity with one another and the moment you switch on the computer, the lights in the modem decide to go on a strike, right?”

“Fantastic Sir, how wonderfully put, my tribulations with the modem! Really I must commend you on your ability to decipher the issue”.

“See Sir, that is why we are here, to serve the public. Now your problem is solved right?”

“Yes, I believe so. The problem is the computer. If I need my broadband to work, then I need to switch off the computer and vice versa. Excellent solution Sir, Thank you”.

“You are welcome, is there anything else that I can assist you with?”

“Oh yes , could you tell me where I could get a bottle of cyanide?”